CHABG

Myrtle Rust Survey

Fighting myrtle rust with collections data.

Myrtle rust on Geraldton Wax flower buds by John Tann, (CC BY 2.0) at https://www.flickr.com/photos/31031835@N08/8595049832

What is Myrtle Rust?

Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) is an introduced fungal pathogen that arrived in Australia in 2010. It spread rapidly throughout the east coast of Australia, impacting the ability of species in the Myrtaceae family to survive and reproduce. This family includes well known Australian plants such as the iconic eucalypts, lilly pillies, bottlebrushes, paperbarks and tea trees. These plants are synonymous with the Australian landscape, and many are found nowhere else in the world.

 Action is needed to better understand species susceptibility, secure ex situ collections, and protect at-risk ecological communities before it’s too late.

CHABG and Botanic Gardens Australia & New Zealand (BGANZ) are seeking information from facilities that hold ex situ (off site) plant, seed or other germplasm collections of Myrtaceae species. This information will help the plant conservation community to better understand the representation of Myrtaceae species in ex situ collections nation-wide. 

The survey will run from August to October 2022 and is open to botanic gardens, seed banks, arboreta, and nurseries that operate for the conservation of native flora

Take part in the survey

If you or your organisation hold conservation collections of Myrtaceae species, we need your help!Please click below to download our survey and return your response to info@chabg.org.au

Information from this survey will be used to inform future prioritisation of myrtle rust-affected species and support the implementation of the Australian Government’s Threatened Species Strategy Action Plan 2021–2026.

Unsure which species are part of the Myrtaceae family?
You can cross-reference your collection here.

Acknowledgements

CHABG and BGANZ  acknowledge the generous biosecurity funding provided by the Australian Government. 

This support will allow us to undertake a stocktake of Myrtaceae species that are currently held in conservation collections in botanic gardens, nurseries and seed banks across the country. 

Rhodamnia rubescens cuttings in the Booderee Botanic Gardens nursery. Image: Damian Wrigley
Part of the Rhodamnia rubescens insurance collection at the Booderee Botanic Gardens nursery. Image: Damian Wrigley
Part of the Rhodamnia rubescens insurance collection at the Booderee Botanic Gardens nursery. Image: Damian Wrigley
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